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Starting out with EDRMS preservation: Selecting a preservation approach

Lorna Williams

Lorna Williams

Last updated on 12 July 2021

Lorna Williams is Senior Archivist at the Bank of England


Background

The Bank of England is the UK's central bank. Its mission is to deliver monetary and financial stability for the people of the United Kingdom. The Bank has had an archive function for over 50 years and it is now one of the finest business archives in the country.  The Archive holds nearly 100,000 items covering all aspects of the Bank’s history and operations since it was established in 1694. As well as meeting the internal needs of the business, the Archive is open to external researchers. Although the archives are not public records, the Bank opens material after 20 years in line with the policy of the UK National Archives. 

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Back to basics at IS&T Archiving 2021: Tailoring Quality Assurance Workflows to your Digitisation Project

Caroline Lebre

Caroline Lebre

Last updated on 9 July 2021

Caroline Lebre is a Digitisation Technician at the Imperial War Museum (IWM) Duxford in England. She attended IS&T Archiving 2021 with support from the DPC’s Career Development Fund, which is funded by DPC Supporters.


I have recently started a position as a Digitisation Technician at the Imperial War Museum (IWM) Duxford in England, digitising the still media collection at the demand of the museum’s clients for various projects. As a recent graduate starting my career in the sector, I applied for a DPC Career Development Fund grant to attend the IS&T Archiving 2021 conference to learn about the ongoing research and debates on digitisation and curation and understand the different practices implemented by cultural heritage institutions. However, I was worried that the conference was intended for experts and professionals with several years of experience in the sector and I would not be able to understand the content discussed during the talks. I was very happy to discover that the Technical Papers Program offered a wide range of talks aimed at practitioners from all backgrounds and experience levels and that instructors were always keen on answering all questions. If you are currently involved in your first digitisation project, this conference will be a great platform for you to learn without barriers, just as it was for me.

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When Ireland said ‘Yes’: digitally-preserving the campaign to Repeal the Eighth Amendment

Lorraine Grimes

Lorraine Grimes

Last updated on 5 July 2021

Dr Lorraine Grimes is a Postdoctoral Researcher and Digital Archivist for the Digital Repository of Ireland


The Archiving Reproductive Health Project aims to provide long-term preservation and access to the many at-risk archives generated by grassroots women’s reproductive health movements during the campaign to Repeal the Eighth Amendment to the Irish Constitution. The project will collect, catalogue and preserve in the Digital Repository of Ireland much of the born-digital content generated by grassroots organisations such as Terminations for Medical Reasons, Together for Yes, Coalition to Repeal the 8th and the Abortion Rights Campaign. It will also preserve digitally-born material, particularly the In Her Shoes Facebook page.

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Living with Legacies (Part 2)

Helen Dafter

Helen Dafter

Last updated on 28 June 2021

In my previous post I set out the context for addressing legacy material held by The Postal Museum. I outlined how I approached the issue of getting content off removable media and work to analysis the file formats. In this post I explain how I am using this experience to plan migration pathways for inaccessible formats, and applying this experience to other material in our collections.

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Doing digital - putting theory in to practice (part three)

Clair Waller

Clair Waller

Last updated on 25 June 2021

Beth Astridge (Project Archivist, UKPA) and Clair Waller (Digital Archivist), University of Kent Special Collections and Archives.


Contemporary collecting and mapping other collections  

This is our final blog post in a series from the University of Kent Special Collections & Archives describing some of our ongoing work to implement robust workflow and processes for the acquisition and management of born digital records, driven by our work to establish the UK Philanthropy Archive.

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Digital Developments in the University of Liverpool’s Special Collections & Archives’

Jenny Higham

Jenny Higham

Last updated on 23 June 2021

Jenny Higham is Head of Special Collections & Archives at the University of Liverpool Library


Amongst many significant changes – including a long period of reading room closure and limited staff access to collections - one lasting impact of Covid-19 on the University of Liverpool’s Special Collections & Archives has been an accelerated transition to delivering more of our service digitally. Unlike some of the other changes, this one is likely to remain permanent as the organisation moves forward with a proposed model of hybrid working.

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Living with Legacies (Part 1)

Helen Dafter

Helen Dafter

Last updated on 21 June 2021

Helen Dafter is the Archivist for The Postal Museum in the UK


In common with most other archives The Postal Museum’s management of digital records has evolved over time. Since 2017 (and earlier for some records) I have tried to capture as much metadata as possible about digital records at the point of acquisition. This includes documenting file formats on entry.

However, the documentation for digital records received prior to this was less detailed. Our earliest digital records date from the mid-1980s and in some cases I was lucky if the existence of a floppy disc was recorded in the entry documentation. It was not unknown for me to only become aware of digital media in what appears to be an analogue deposit when I opened the box. Another complication with these earlier records is that they are often on obsolete media. Having these on my desk always created lots of curiosity from younger colleagues.

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Doing digital - putting theory in to practice (part two)

Clair Waller

Clair Waller

Last updated on 17 June 2021

Beth Astridge (Project Archivist, UKPA) and Clair Waller (Digital Archivist), University of Kent Special Collections and Archives.


This is the second in a series of blog posts from the University of Kent Special Collections & Archives describing some of our ongoing work to implement robust workflow and processes for the acquisition and management of born digital records, driven by our work to establish the UK Philanthropy Archive. 

In this blog we discuss how we developed guidelines for the cataloguing of born-digital materials, we share our thinking relating to how we will manage material containing personal data, and we consider how best we can make digital collections accessible for our users.  

Collections Management – Cataloguing, Access and Discovery 

In Special Collections & Archives, our long-term goal is that we are able to showcase our rich and diverse digital collections to a world-wide audience, securely and intuitively, engaging people with our archives, telling the story of the University of Kent, and developing our reputation as a trusted repository for digital content.  

To achieve this vision, we need to address how we approach cataloguing digital material and consider the various factors relating to how to make these collections accessible.  

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How FAIR-Aware are your users?

Marjan Grootveld & Ingrid Dillo

Marjan Grootveld & Ingrid Dillo

Last updated on 17 June 2021

Marjan Grootveld is Research Data Expert Team Leader at DANS and Ingrid Dillo is Deputy Director at DANS and FAIRsFAIR project coordinator.


Ever since the origin of the FAIR data guiding principles in 2014, Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS) staff have been involved in activities on thinking about their implications and implementing them. The conviction that research data sets in our long-term repository and in other repositories should be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable is deeply ingrained in the DANS organisation and in our services. We were involved as co-authors of the original publication on the FAIR principles, developed and tested FAIR metrics, worked on tools to rate the FAIRness of datasets, evaluated how our own data archives score on FAIRness, compared the principles to the requirements of the Data Seal of Approval and the CoreTrustSeal, and explored the applicability of the FAIR principles to Software Sustainability. At iPRES 2019 we presented an overview of our first five years of FAIR activities.

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5 tips to rock the RAM

Kim Harsley

Kim Harsley

Last updated on 15 June 2021

Kimberley Harsley is an Archivist at the Natwest Group.


The introduction of the DPC’s Rapid Assessment Model (RAM) in 2019 came at a perfect time for me. Still reasonably new to NatWest Group Archives, it was a great opportunity for me to learn more about our digital preservation work whilst contributing to it. This month, I revisited the RAM to assess how far we’ve come since then. I found it much easier the second time around as I was more familiar with the content and the archive itself. Having completed the RAM twice, here are my top tips.

1.     Talk it over

Although it’s certainly possible to do the assessment as a lone archivist, it’s useful to discuss your scores with someone else. Some parts of the assessment require careful consideration  about your particular situation. For example, working in a large organisation meant that assessing the commitment of senior stakeholders required close thought about who our senior stakeholders actually are. Rationally, the chief executive doesn’t need to be invested in our digital preservation programme for it to be successful (that’s not to say I wouldn’t be delighted if she were to give her support!). Being able to discuss this and challenge each other’s ideas made our eventual assessment more meaningful.

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