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iPres 2022 Blog by Wellington da Silva

WS

Wellington da Silva

Last updated on 19 October 2022

I discovered iPres in 2019 when I was looking for articles for my final master's work. I found many good papers that helped me a lot. When I started searching for more about iPres and decided to participate in the next one, which would be in 2020, it didn't happen because of the pandemic. However, I didn't give up; I kept following on social media to keep updated. Participating in iPres meant acquiring more knowledge about digital preservation, to put it into practice in my job, and the result was better than expected. 

 

I am currently an archivist at the National Library of Brazil, working in records management and I am a member of the permanent commission for digital preservation. Since 2018, the production of digital documents has been growing in my institution, and has required acquiring more knowledge to preserve them. In addition, we have the largest digital library in Latin America, with 2,138,378 million documents. Attending this conference in 2022 helped me outline strategies, exchange experiences and ideas with professionals from four continents, to preserve all these digital documents. 

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iPRES 2022: Climate Change and Environmental Sustainability

Matthew Addis

Matthew Addis

Last updated on 18 October 2022

Matthew Addis is Chief Technology Officer at Arkivum.


One area that stood out for me at iPRES this year was the thread of climate change and environmental sustainability that weaved its way through several parts of the conference.

In the panel session called ‘”IT'S ALL IMPORTANT OF COURSE, BUT…”, which hotly debated the question of what is the most important challenge in digital preservation (costs, advocacy, and people all came high up the list, and rightly so), I think it was Keith Pendergrass, one of the authors of a seminal report on the environmental sustainability of digital preservation, who made the observation from the audience that “how to ensure content is sustained through climate collapse is perhaps the biggest challenge for preservation”.    This struck me as particularly relevant given other sessions at iPRES had talked about grass-roots collecting and archives, including in local communities and in developing countries.  It won’t be content in the national libraries that will be lost, but content in small archives like these that are hit with increasingly extreme climate events that literally destroy their very existence.  

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DCDC 2022 - Inclusive, Diverse, Collections for the Future - now!

Adrian Clark

Adrian Clark

Last updated on 13 October 2022

Adrian Clark is Academic Librarian for the Wolfson School of Engineering at Loughborough University. He attended DCDC 2022 with the support of the DPC Career Development Fund, which is funded by DPC Supporters.


I am the Academic Librarian for the Wolfson School of Engineering at Loughborough University. My interests are in research support and how data archiving and preservation underpins the scholarly record and can create new research opportunities. Having worked in the cultural and heritage sector previously as well as my current role I was excited to listen to so many different perspectives at the 2022 Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities (DCDC 2022) conference this past July.

One of my first thoughts on looking at the conference programme was that: “I wish our archivist was here with me!” Loughborough is currently recruiting to replace our Archivist; the university archive records the organization's inception as The Loughborough Technical Institute in 1909 to its present structure as a world class university. Additionally, the library is currently revisioning its strategy. Two strands of that process Opening Up Research and Contributing Towards Knowledge Exchange, supplied a key reason for attending DCDC 2022. I was hoping to identify potential partners to help us tell the story of our institution better and to figure out if we could do things differently when it comes to collection curation. I wasn’t disappointed! Below I have brought together the themes of several of the talks that I attended and the learning they prompted.

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Reach Out I’ll Be There – World Mental Health Day 2022

Sharon McMeekin

Sharon McMeekin

Last updated on 10 October 2022

After (non-Covid) illness and a holiday, today, 10th October, is my first proper day back “in the office” after iPres 2022. It seems fitting that the day is also World Mental Health Day 2022, marking a day of action and reflection on a topic that is very important to me. I’ve blogged before on my own mental health struggles and the impact that the start of the pandemic had on me, and this seems like the ideal time to revisit the topic of mental health.

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My iPres: some personal highlights

Jenny Mitcham

Jenny Mitcham

Last updated on 7 October 2022

Ever since returning from Glasgow last month I have been meaning to get my thoughts down on my own iPres experiences. Writing this post has been a good way for me to organise my own thoughts and learnings from the conference and also a good excuse to dip into some of the written proposals and presentation recordings, but I think the time spent has been worth it. This is an account of how iPres was for me!

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Digital Preservation frameworks, strategies and policies

Robin Wright

Robin Wright

Last updated on 28 September 2022

Robin Wright is Head of Australasia and Asia-Pacific for the DPC

In August earlier this year Australasia Preserves, a Community of Practice that supports the discussion of digital preservation in Australasia, collaborated with National and State Libraries Australasia to hold an online meetup session exploring Digital preservation frameworks, strategies, and policies.

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Community and sustainability

Rachel MacGregor

Rachel MacGregor

Last updated on 28 September 2022

Rachel MacGregor is Digital Preservation Officer at the University of Warwick

I’m writing this with the stardust of iPres 2022 still glinting on me and reflecting back on everything I did and everything I learnt at the conference. Everyone has a different conference – this one was no exception - and the packed programme meant that there was always going to be lots of stuff I will never catch up (although a great deal was recorded). You can read William’s blog about the organisation (which was amazing) – all I am aiming to do is to share some of my highlights and what I plan to do next with what I have learnt.

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iPres radio at iPres 2022 in Glasgow

Robin Wright

Robin Wright

Last updated on 26 September 2022

iPres radio 1Robin Wright is Head of Australasia and Asia-Pacific for the DPC

During iPres this year, online delegates from Australasia and the Asia-Pacific had an additional way to engage with the iPres program and other attendees from their region by tuning in to iPres radio. This was a series of five half hour open zoom sessions run by the DPC’s Head Australasia and Asia-Pacific each day at 14:00 AEST (12:00 SGT, 16:00 NZST) that was designed for online delegates from the Australasia and Asia-Pacific region.

It provided an informal forum for delegates from the region allowing them to interact and find out more information about events at iPres at a convenient local time. The sessions also provided an introduction to the iPres Sunrise sessions being held later that day at 7.30am Glasgow time (16:30 – 18:00 AEST, 14:30 – 16:00 SGT, 18:30 – 20:00 NZST).

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People Make iPres

William Kilbride

William Kilbride

Last updated on 23 September 2022

In November 2011, the organizers of the annual fireworks display in the beautiful town of Oban got in a muddle. Instead of their show taking 20 minutes, the whole carefully choreographed lot went up in 45 seconds. It was all perfectly safe so the (surprisingly short) video of the event is one of the most stupendously silly things you will find on the internet today: chaotic, brief, stunning, colourful, intense, loud, joyful and somewhat predictably called the ‘Obang Fiasco’.    

It’s a strange place to start a blog about iPres but it came to me while I was driving home from the conference on Friday. iPres 2022 started with an email exchange in the first week of March 2017: five and half years in planning and less than five days in delivery. I have common cause this week with the astonished audience of Obang. What on Earth has just happened?

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A perpetual motion machine: The preserved digital scholarly record

Neil Jefferies

Neil Jefferies

Last updated on 22 September 2022

A new paper in Learned Publishing by Tom Cramer (Stanford University Library), Chip German (University of Virginia Library), Neil Jefferies (Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford) and Alicia Wise (CLOCKSS) looks at the intersection between the rapidly changing worlds of Digital Preservation and Scholarly Publishing.

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