DPC

New member consultation on PDF/A validation tools

Added on 9 June 2015

The veraPDF Consortium is developing a new toolset for addressing preservation issues with PDF/A files and is consulting members to ensure the tools meet their needs.

As part of the EC and PREFORMA Project funded veraPDF consortium, tools will be developed to validate PDF/A files and enable the checking of any PDF/A against an institutional policy. The tools will both help to improve the quality of PDF/As in wider circulation while also enabling organisations to identify problematic PDF/As within their archives. Full details can be found in the attached overview.

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The Digital Preservation Coalition welcomes Loughborough University as its latest associate member

Added on 4 June 2015

The DPC is delighted to welcome Loughborough University as its latest associate member. This new membership is also something of a milestone; Loughborough University is now the 50th member of the ever-growing Coalition. William Kilbride, Executive Director of the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) said ‘I am delighted to welcome Loughborough University as our 50th member which is an important landmark in our development and a great opportunity to celebrate our shared endeavour. Loughborough has a large volume of digital educational resources and it is wonderful to see institutions with such expertise recognising the need to collaborate on digital preservation.’

Adrienne Muir, Senior Lecturer in Publishing within the School of the Arts, English and Drama explained why Loughborough decided to join the DPC; ‘Various groups across the institution are involved in

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Making Progress in Digital Preservation, Liverpool 10th July: Registration Open

Added on 2 June 2015

Registration is now open for 'Making Progress in Digital Preservation, Liverpool 10th July:

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Priority Registration opens for 'Preserving Documents Forever' Oxford 15th July

Added on 29 May 2015

The Digital Preservation Coalition and the Open Preservation Foundation, with generous support from the European Commission and the PREFORMA project, cordially invite members to a briefing day on preserving PDF files at Oxford University on Wednesday 15th July 2015.

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Richard Ovenden returns to DPC as President

Added on 12 May 2015

DPCAwards068Richard Ovenden has been elected to serve as President of the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), the first time the Board of the Coalition has elected a president.

Bodley’s Librarian for the University of Oxford, and former Chair of the DPC, Richard is no stranger to the digital preservation community, having worked in Libraries since the late 1980’s and directly in digital preservation since around 2000.  He is exceptionally well placed to promote the objects and aims of the Coalition, encouraging key figures to join the task of achieving the aims of the Digital Preservation Coalition.

“I am delighted to become the President of the DPC,” Richard said, “Digital Preservation grows with importance daily, as more of our lives –both personal and professional - are conducted digitally. The DPC has played a crucial role in raising standards, in training and skills development, and in advocacy and awareness raising over the past 12 years – I am very proud of its achievements and am delighted to be working with the DPC Board and staff to further the cause of digital preservation’

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DPC Offers Scholarships for DPTP - An Introduction to Digital Preservation

Added on 12 May 2015

The Digital Preservation Coalition is pleased to offer two scholarships to attend the upcoming June 2015 instance of ULCC’s DPTP – An Introduction to Digital Preservation course at Senate House, University of London, London.

An Introduction to Digital Preservation is an entry-level course aimed at complete beginners who wish to learn more about the field. The course is ideal for starters in all disciplines who want to know more about digital preservation. The course is a starting point. It passes on awareness of subjects that need to be investigated in more depth, so those attending can expect a good deal of further reading afterwards and practical follow-up training / experience on their own behalf. The complements the regular Digital Preservation Coalition Event "Getting Started in Digital Preservation", and has been devised in full co-operation with the DPC.

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Making Progress in Digital Preservation, Glasgow 2015

Presentations

Introduction

Digital preservation - representing all the activities necessary to ensure that digital objects and data can be found, accessed and deployed beyond the limits of technological obsolescence, media failure or creator dependency - is a growing challenge for agencies and individuals in all kinds of contexts. Our generation has invested as never before in digital resources and we've done so because of the opportunity they bring. Digital collections have grown in volume, complexity and importance to the point that our children are baffled by the inefficiencies of the analogue age. Pervasive, fluid and vital: digital data is a defining feature of our age. Industry, commerce, government, law, research, health, social care, education, the creative industries, the heritage sector and private life depend on digital materials to satisfy ubiquitous information needs and expectations. But digital objects are fragile: at risk of loss, corruption or obsolescence, not to mention unlawful alteration or theft. Collection managers, IT officers, academic researchers, broadcasters, developers and industrial regulators need to ensure that the digital collections which they use and depend upon are accessible for the long-term: but training in these new skills can be hard to acquire.

For several years now the DPC and partners have offered an introductory one day workshop called 'Getting Started in Digital Preservation' which is designed to outline approaches and tools which will help organisations assess their digital preservation needs and plan their response. This has proven popular but we recognise the very great need to follow on with something which takes organisations forward in the response: from assessment into action. This new workshop 'Making Progress in Digital Preservation' is designed to meet that need. Responding to the greater subtlety required when implementing policies and plans, this workshop will examine three key areas of organisational needs: policy, resources and technology. By the end of the workshop - which will include time for networking and sharing - participants will be equipped with practical targets for implementing digital preservation, as well as guidance and tools to make those targets achievable.

Presentations and case studies will help participants:

  • Understand the emerging issues in digital preservation
  • Assess institutional readiness and create an institutional preservation plan
  • Draft a digital preservation policy
  • Understand and articulate the costs and benefits of digital preservation
  • Understand the role of self-assessment and certification of third party services
  • Understand the practical implementation and limitations of available tools
  • Meet and network with others locally working in digital preservation

Who should come?

  • Collections managers, records managers, librarians and archivists in all institutions, but especially in commercial agencies
  • IT managers and chief technology officers, chief information officers in institutions or agencies with a need for long-lived data
  • Staff looking to gather or exploit 'big data' for corporate goals
  • Students and researchers in information science and related fields
  • Researchers with interests in research data management

Indicative Programme

1000: Registration opens
1030: Welcome and Introduction - Starting Digital Preservation is Easy, Making Progress is Harder
1130: Assessing Preservation Readiness and Organisation Alignment
1200: Writing a Preservation Policy
1230: Feedback and discussion
1245: Lunch
1330: Managing Your Digital Preservation Skillset: The DigCurV Competency Framework
1400: Standards for Digital Preservation and Self-Certification: The Data Seal of Approval
1430: Q&A
1445: Coffee Break
1500: Digital Preservation in Practice: Case Studies
1545: Roundtable and General Questions
1630: Close

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Getting Started in Digital Preservation, Belfast 2015

Introduction

The Digital Preservation Coalition is delighted to invite you to join them at series of workshops which will equip collection managers, archivists, librarians and conservators with the skills necessary for ‘Getting started in Digital Preservation.’

Our generation has invested as never before in digital resources and we've done so because of the opportunity they bring. Digital collections have grown in volume, complexity and importance to the point that our children are baffled by the inefficiencies of the analogue age. Pervasive, fluid and vital: digital data is a defining feature of our age. Industry, commerce, government, law, research, health, social care, education, the creative industries, the heritage sector and private life depend on digital materials to satisfy ubiquitous information needs and expectations. But digital objects are fragile: at risk of loss, corruption or obsolescence, not to mention unlawful alteration or theft. Digital preservation – the series of managed activities necessary to ensure that digital materials remain accessible beyond the limits of obsolescence - is an issue which all organisations, particularly in the knowledge sector, will need to address sooner or later. Collection managers need digital preservation skills to ensure access to their growing digital collections, but training in these new skills can be hard to acquire.

This day long introduction assumes no prior knowledge except a willingness to engage with digital preservation. Through a series of presentations, case studies and exercises, participants will learn how to apply techniques of assessment, risk management and planning to help secure their digital collections.

Presentations and exercises will help participants:

  • Understand the range of issues associated with digital preservation
  • Survey and characterize a digital collection
  • Undertake preliminary risk assessment to manage their own digital collections
  • Understand preservation planning and write a basic preservation plan
  • Meet and network with others locally working in digital preservation

Who should come?

These workshops will interest:

  • Collections managers, librarians, curators and archivists in all institutions
  • IT managers in memory institutions
  • Records managers in institutions with a need for long-lived data
  • CIO’s in organisations with commercial intellectual property
  • Students and researchers in information science and related fields
  • Researchers with interests in research data management

Outline Programme

  • 1000 – Registration open, tea and coffee
  • 1030 – Welcome and Introductions
  • 1035 – Introducing digital preservation
  • 1100 – Making sense of a collection
  • 1120 – Discussion
  • 1130 – Tool demo: making sense of a collection
  • 1140 – Risk assessment and Digital Preservation
  • 1200 – Risk assessment exercise
  • 1240 – Discussion
  • 1245 – Lunch (provided)
  • 1400 – Planning Digital Preservation Case Study
  • 1420 – Preservation planning for beginners
  • 1435 – Preservation Planning exercise
  • 1500 – Comfort break
  • 1515 – Next steps in digital preservation
  • 1545 – Roundtable discussion
  • 1600 – Close
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It's Personal: Collecting, Preserving and Using Personal Digital Archives

Introduction

Digital preservation has made significant strides in the last two decades, primarily at corporate or institutional levels. This takes different expressions in different contexts such as the establishment of institutional repositories for research outputs; the incorporation of digital preservation within institutional missions; or the assertion of regulatory and statutory requirements for data retention for companies. Although much work remains to be done, institutions are not only beginning to recognise the need for digital preservation but are increasingly able to deliver on those requirements. All of this is welcome but development has been somewhat one-sided insofar as corporate memory is being privileged over the personal. For a decade or more, family photographs, home movies, private correspondence, personal journals and all manner of individual creativity has been digital. Only a very small fraction of that is comfortably accommodated in corporate archives. So. without appropriate and thoughtful action, future generations might be faced the unappetising prospect of a digital memory dominated by corporate and civic actions and denuded of personal narrative.

This challenge is especially marked in a generation which has found particular value in personal narratives of the past – whether as genealogy, community archives or local history. Is it possible that the decade which gave us ‘Who do you think you are’ could inadvertently become invisible to future generations? How might an individual or family respond to the apparently labyrinthine infrastructural requirements of digital preservation? How should an archive or library respond to a member of the public seeking to deposit a personal digital collection?

In late 2014, the DPC commissioned a Technology Watch Report to provide an overview of the key issues related to personal digital archiving, arguing for the importance of preserving personal files and acknowledging the complexity of personal archives that include a combination of physical, digitised, and born-digital materials. This report, a conscious effort to improve the prospects of personal digital collections as a source for future generations, is close to completion and is now ready for a preview to DPC members. This one-day workshop will give DPC members a chance to debate the implications of personal digital archives. Case studies will be presented and consideration will be given to what future and emerging trends may change how archivists, curators, researchers and members of the public collect, preserve and use these complicated but vital sources.

Who should come?

This briefing day will interest:

  • Collections managers, librarians, curators, archivists in memory institutions
  • CIOs and CTOs in organisations with commercial intellectual property
  • Records managers and business analysts with requirements for long-lived data or legacy systems
  • Vendors and developers with digital preservation solutions
  • Researchers with interests e-infrastructure and digital preservation
  • Researchers interested in exploring and using personal digital archives
  • Estate lawyers and executors managing and overseeing personal digital collections

Outline Programme

  • 1000 – Registration open, tea and coffee
  • 1015 – Webinar opens
  • 1030 – Welcome
  • 1035 – Overview and Introduction (Gabriela Redwine, Yale University)
  • 1120 – Brief Q&A
  • 1125 – Webinar closes and comfort break

Case Studies

  • 1130 – Case study one (Bette Baldwin)
  • 1150 – Case study two (TBC)
  • 1210 – Case study three (TBC)
  • 1230 – Q&A
  • 1245 – Lunch (provided)

Emerging Trends

  • 1345 – Emerging trends one (Jenny Bunn, University College London)
  • 1415 - Emerging trends two (Amber Cushing, University College Dublin)
  • 1445 - Emerging trends three - the US experience (TBC / by video link)
  • 1515 – Tea and coffee
  • 1530 – Roundtable
  • 1620 – Recommendations and Next steps
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Getting Started in Digital Preservation, London 2015

Presentations

Introduction

The Digital Preservation Coalition is delighted to invite you to join them at series of workshops which will equip collection managers, archivists, librarians and conservators with the skills necessary for ‘Getting started in Digital Preservation.’

Our generation has invested as never before in digital resources and we've done so because of the opportunity they bring. Digital collections have grown in volume, complexity and importance to the point that our children are baffled by the inefficiencies of the analogue age. Pervasive, fluid and vital: digital data is a defining feature of our age. Industry, commerce, government, law, research, health, social care, education, the creative industries, the heritage sector and private life depend on digital materials to satisfy ubiquitous information needs and expectations. But digital objects are fragile: at risk of loss, corruption or obsolescence, not to mention unlawful alteration or theft. Digital preservation – the series of managed activities necessary to ensure that digital materials remain accessible beyond the limits of obsolescence - is an issue which all organisations, particularly in the knowledge sector, will need to address sooner or later. Collection managers need digital preservation skills to ensure access to their growing digital collections, but training in these new skills can be hard to acquire.

This day long introduction assumes no prior knowledge except a willingness to engage with digital preservation. Through a series of presentations, case studies and exercises, participants will learn how to apply techniques of assessment, risk management and planning to help secure their digital collections.

Presentations and exercises will help participants:

  • Understand the range of issues associated with digital preservation
  • Survey and characterize a digital collection
  • Undertake preliminary risk assessment to manage their own digital collections
  • Understand preservation planning and write a basic preservation plan
  • Meet and network with others locally working in digital preservation

Who should come?

These workshops will interest:

  • Collections managers, librarians, curators and archivists in all institutions
  • IT managers in memory institutions
  • Records managers in institutions with a need for long-lived data
  • CIO’s in organisations with commercial intellectual property
  • Students and researchers in information science and related fields
  • Researchers with interests in research data management

Outline Programme

  • 1000 – Registration open, tea and coffee
  • 1030 – Welcome and Introductions
  • 1035 – Introducing digital preservation
  • 1100 – Making sense of a collection
  • 1120 – Discussion
  • 1130 – Tool demo: making sense of a collection
  • 1140 – Risk assessment and Digital Preservation
  • 1200 – Risk assessment exercise
  • 1240 – Discussion
  • 1245 – Lunch (provided)
  • 1400 – Planning Digital Preservation Case Study
  • 1420 – Preservation planning for beginners
  • 1435 – Preservation Planning exercise
  • 1500 – Comfort break
  • 1515 – Next steps in digital preservation
  • 1545 – Roundtable discussion
  • 1600 – Close
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