DPC

Preserving Digital Art: Directions and Perspectives

Emerging tools and services for digital preservation are typically built around the long-term needs of archives, libraries and research centres. The needs of art museums and galleries are surprisingly absent from much of the debate in digital preservation even though these institutions have considerable skills and statutory requirements to safeguard large collections for private and public good. Innovations in contemporary art means that the traditional skills of the conservator need to be supplemented, and in some cases radically changed, to take account of new and sophisticated forms of digital creativity. Moreover its subtle and complex demands means that preservation of digital art offers a practical basis for innovation and assessment of the sorts of tools and services which will be required to ensure our digital memory is accessible tomorrow.

This DPC briefing day will provide a forum for members to review and debate the latest development in the preservation of digital art. Based on commentary and case studies from leaders in the field, participants will be presented with emerging tools and technologies and will be encouraged to propose and debate new directions for research. The day will include a discussion of key

  • Preservation of software and software-based art
  • Access documentation and retrieval of online art
  • Emerging tools and policies for preservation

Who should come?

This day will be of interest to:

  • Collections manager, curators and conservators with interests in contemporary art
  • Tools developers and policy makers in digital preservation
  • Innovators and researchers in contemporary art and conservation
  • Innovators and researchers in computing science
  • Vendors and providers of collections management services in cultural heritage

Draft Programme Outline

1030 Registration and Coffee
1100 Welcome and introductions (William Kilbride, DPC)
1110 The nature of the problem, Prof David Duce, Oxford Brookes University
1130 Collecting, conserving and managing digital art – an institutional perspective Pip Laurenson and Kate Jennings, Tate
1150 Digital Art Online: perspectives on user needs, access, documentation and retrieval Leo Konstantelos, Glasgow University
1210 Commissioning, creating and commissioning: Digital Art in Practice Sarah Cook, CRUMB
1230 Discussion and questions
1300 Lunch
1340 Preserving digital art: Art Theory, Methods and Experimental ApplicationsPerla Innocenti, Glasgow University
1400 Preserving the software in software based art Brian Matthews, STFC
1420 Software-based art from delivery to display- Case Studies from the Tate Collection, Patricia Falcao, Tate
1440 Coffee
1500 Discussion: what is to be done, why and by whom?
1600 Close

Download programme and introduction

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The Datum Project at the University of Northumbria and the Digital Preservation Coalition are delighted to announce that registration for 'Data For Life: Digital Preservation and Health Sciences' is now open -

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National Library of Ireland joins the Coalition

Added on 24 March 2011

The National Library of Ireland is the latest organisation to join the Digital Preservation Coalition, helping the Library to address the challenges and opportunities associated with long term management of digital collections.

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Getting Started in Digital Preservation, Cardiff 2011

Following on from the very successful 'Decoding the Digital' conference, the British Library Preservation Advisory Centre and the Digital Preservation Coalition are delighted to invite you to the third of four events designed to raise awareness of digital preservation issues, increase involvement with digital preservation activities and sign-post the support and resources available to help you on your way. This event provides an introduction to digital preservation, builds an understanding of the risks to digital materials, includes practical sessions to help you apply digital preservation planning and tools, and features speakers sharing their own experience of putting digital preservation into practice.


Who should come?

The sessions are aimed at librarians, archivists and collection managers in all sectors and in all sizes of institution who want to find out more about digital preservation and the implications for their organisation of having to retain, manage and provide ongoing access to large quantities of digital material. Throughout the day participants will gain confidence in addressing digital preservation issues and knowledge of achievable steps to put theory into practice and safeguard vulnerable digital content.


Programme outline

1030 Tea and coffee

1100 Welcome

1105 Introducing digital preservation William Kilbride (DPC)

1135 Things we wished we'd known: aka a DP confessional, Malcolm Todd (TNA)

1205 Risk assessment for digital preservation William Kilbride (DPC)

1235 Exercise - risk assessment in practice

1320 Lunch

14.00 Planning digital preservation, Caroline Peach PAC

14.20 Group sessions: planning digital preservation

15.10 Break

15.25 Case study: experience of using digital preservation tools, William Kilbride (DPC)

15.50 Where to go from here and final discussion, William Kilbride (DPC)

16.30 Close

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DPC Leadership Programme offers scholarships to attend DPTP, Glasgow 16-18 May

Added on 18 March 2011

The DPC is pleased to announce that it will be offering five scholarship to attend the Digital Preservation Training Programme, this time in Glasgow, 16-18th May 2011.  The deadline for applications is 1200 on Friday 29th April.  All DPC members are entitled to apply although this is the last opportunity for members of RLUK to benefit from the DPC Leadership Programme. 

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Added on 14 March 2011

We're pleased to report that the DPC briefing day on Preserving Digital Sound and Vision is now fully booked.  We've retained a couple of places in order that DPC members who may have missed the announcement can still attend. 

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The Digital Preservation Coalition is delighted to welcome the National Library of Ireland as its latest associate member

Added on 1 March 2011

The National Library of Ireland is the latest organisation to join the Digital Preservation Coalition, helping the Library to address the challenges and opportunities associated with long term management of digital collections.

'The core mission of the National Library of Ireland (NLI) is to collect, preserve, promote and make accessible the documentary and intellectual record of the life of Ireland,' explained Della Murphy, Assistant Keeper at NLI. 'One of our key strategic aims is the development of a digital collections policy with preservation and access infrastructure to match. By putting in place the necessary policy and infrastructure, we will maximise access to our resources, enhance and expand the services we offer, and enable users to work with the Library and Library collections in new and innovative ways.'

'The National Library of Ireland believes that working with partners in the DPC will vitally inform and support the implementation of best practice in relation to policy and infrastructural development in the area of digital preservation.'

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Getting Started in Digital Preservation, Glasgow 2011

Following on from the very successful 'Decoding the Digital' conference, the British Library Preservation Advisory Centre and the Digital Preservation Coalition are delighted to invite you to the first of four events designed to raise awareness of digital preservation issues, increase involvement with digital preservation activities and sign-post the support and resources available to help you on your way. This event provides an introduction to digital preservation, builds an understanding of the risks to digital materials, includes practical sessions to help you apply digital preservation planning and tools, and features speakers sharing their own experience of putting digital preservation into practice.


Who should come?

The sessions are aimed at librarians, archivists and collection managers in all sectors and in all sizes of institution who want to find out more about digital preservation and the implications for their organisation of having to retain, manage and provide ongoing access to large quantities of digital material. Throughout the day participants will gain confidence in addressing digital preservation issues and knowledge of achievable steps to put theory into practice and safeguard vulnerable digital content.


Programme outline

10.30 Welcome

10.35 Introducing digital preservation (pdf 2,349kb) - Dr William Kilbride, DPC

11.05 Small steps and lasting impact: making a start with preservation (pdf 1,008kb)  - Patricia Sleeman, ULCC

11.35 Break

11.50 Risk assessment for digital preservation (pdf 1,018kb) - Dr William Kilbride, DPC

12.00 Exercise - risk assessment in practice - Dr William Kilbride, DPC

12.45 Lunch

13.30 PLATO: planning digital preservation (pdf 2,024kb) - Bram Ven Der Werf, Open PLANETS Foundation

13.50 Group sessions: planning digital preservation

14.40 Break

15.00 Case study: experience of using digital preservation tools (pdf 1,035 kb) - Ed Fay, London School of Economics

15.25 Where to go from here, and final discussion

16.00 Close

 

 

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DPC and DigCurV: A new Framework for Vocational Education

Added on 16 February 2011

The DPC is an associate partner of a new EU- sponsored inisitative seeking to build a new framework for vocational education in for digital preservation.  The DigCurV project is a 30 month project that aims to address the availability of vocational education and training needed by curators in the library, archive, museum and cultural heritage sectors to develop the new skills that are essential for the long-term management of digital collections.

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Registration now open for Preserving Digital Art, Directions and Perspectives, London 30th March

Added on 11 February 2011

Emerging tools and services for digital preservation are typically built around the long-term needs of archives, libraries and research centres. The needs of art museums and galleries are surprisingly absent from much of the debate in digital preservation even though these institutions have considerable skills and statutory requirements to safeguard large collections for private and public good. Innovations in contemporary art means that the traditional skills of the conservator need to be supplemented, and in some cases radically changed, to take account of new and sophisticated forms of digital creativity. Moreover its subtle and complex demands means that preservation of digital art offers a practical basis for innovation and assessment of the sorts of tools and services which will be required to ensure our digital memory is accessible tomorrow.

Read More

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