DPC

ASR2: Using METS to keep data and metadata together for preservation

Sara Day Thomson

Sara Day Thomson

Last updated on 13 December 2016

Long-term access is improved when content and metadata are wrapped in a single package. In this way data managers will be able to access technical and administrative information with the content. The METS standard can help achieve this.

This case note examines the 'Archival Sound Recordings 2' project from the British Library, noting that one of the challenges for long term access to digitised content is to ensure that descriptive information and digitised content are not separated from each other. The British Library has used a standard called METS to prevent this.


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New Digital Preservation Case Note released: how to keep data and metadata together

Added on 28 July 2010

The DPC, with help from the British Library , Portico and ULCC, and with funding from JISC, is pleased to announce the launch of the fourth in a series of Digital Preservation Case Notes.  The Case Notes offer straightforward examples of organisations and individuals tackling the digital preservation challenges that come from mass digitization.  The latest describes the Archival Sound Recordings (2) project from the British Library.  It discusses the benefits that accrue to preservation when content and metadata are wrapped together - and a technology called METS which can help to achieve that.

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Decoding the digital: A common language for preservation

This one day conference, organised jointly between the DPC and the BL Preservation Advisory Centre, seeks to build on the communication between librarians, archivists, curators, conservators and digital preservation managers and establish a shared understanding of the issues surrounding the preservation of digital collections.

What are the similarities in our approach to the preservation of physical and digital collections, and where do the differences lie? The programme features pairs of speakers talking about the creation, management, preservation and use of digital collections. One speaker from each pair explores how use and access shapes approaches to digital preservation, and the other looks at the same issue from the technological perspective. The conference provides an introduction to digital preservation issues for the uninitiated and encourages those involved in the technology supporting digital preservation to learn how collections are developed and used.

Programme

09.30 Registration
10.00 Welcome
10.15 A user’s-eye view of digital content creation  Aly Conteh, British Library
10.40 Digital shelf life: building files to last Joel Eaton, JISC Digital Media
11.20 Break
11.40 Same as it ever was: significant properties and the preservation of meaning through time Gareth Knight, CeRch
12.10 Start making Sense: Talking Data Management to Researchers Catharine Ward, University of Cambridge
12.40 Lunch
13.40

Cutting the beast down to size: the role of risk evaluation in determining preservation strategies Richard Blake, The National Archives

14.10 Preservation in practice - what are the options? A case study Alexandra Eveleigh, UCL
15.00 What users want Michael Jubb, RIN
15.25 Frameworks for e-content Neil Grindley, JISC
15.50 The LIFE3 Project - cost modelling for digital collections, Brian Hole, The British Library
16.30 Summing up and discussion
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DPC Digital Preservation Award and ICON Conservation Awards deadline for applications approaches

Added on 20 July 2010

The DPC Digital Preservation Award 2010 and ICON Conservation Awards deadline approaches - noon 30th July 2010.

The Digital Preservation Award celebrates the excellence and innovation that will help to ensure our digital memory is available tomorrow. It is one of a set of awards which are collectively called the Conservation Awards.  The Conservation Awards began in 1993 and their presentation is co-ordinated by a working party of the Institute for Conservation (Icon). There are five awards in total. The Digital Preservation Award has been run three times (2004, 2005 and 2007) Although based on the high level criteria of the Conservation Awards, the size of the community and the nature of the work it recognises means that the Digital Preservation Award is is distinctive in how it implements the criteria and eligibility.

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DPC Response to Public Records Review

The DPC has responded to the consultation on the Public records review, welcoming the explicit statement that digitized and ‘born digital’ materials constitute a public record, noting and supporting the focus on informational content and the consequent need for ‘technology proofing’ and the management of formats.  The DPC has offered its assistance in identifying and resolving issues that may arise.

Research shows that clear advice about the preservation of digital materials is both in high demand and can be difficult to procure, so we note the new role for the Keepr of the Public Record to advise and inspect archives.  The DPC has offered its help in two ways: to assist the Keeper in the production of specialist advice notes; and to support the Keeper in the wider dissemination of advice to a diverse audience that is hungry for solutions.

 'This represents an opportunity to build capacity for digital preservation in a diverse range of authorities' explained William Kilbride, Executive Director of the DPC.

Full text of the DPC response to the consultation.

Full text of the consultation

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Personal Membership of the DPC: Application Pack Released

Added on 1 July 2010

At its meeting today, the DPC Board approved a new class of membership which will allow sole traders, consultants and recently graduated students to participate in the work of the Coalition.  Personal membership has been introduced for a trial period of 12 months from 1st August 2010. 

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Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) at Glasgow University joins the DPC

Added on 29 June 2010

The Digital Preservation Coalition is delighted to welcome the Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) at Glasgow University as its newest associate member.

Since its foundation, HATII has had a strong commitment to digital preservation and digitization. It has been involved in a large number of collaborative initiatives such as the Digital Curation Centre, the PLANETS project, Digital Preservation Europe and Erpanet.

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HATII at Glasgow University joins the DPC

Added on 24 June 2010

The Digital Preservation Coalition is delighted to welcome the Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) at Glasgow University as its newest associate member.

'Since its foundation, HATII has had a strong commitment to digital preservation and digitization. It has been involved in a large number of collaborative initiatives such as the Digital Curation Centre, the PLANETS project, Digital Preservation Europe and Erpanet.

'HATII sees new opportunities to frame its research through DPC membership as well as an opportunity to influence policy and practice', explained Ann Gow, Associate Director.  'Long term access to digital resources is an aspiration across the public and private sectors.  It requires a diverse range of experience if it is to be achieved

HATII is delighted to join the DPC as an associate member.  We recognise the value of partnership in this critical area and look forward to interdisciplinary collaboration with the DPC'

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Welsh Journals Online: Effective Leadership for a Common Goal

By Sara Day Thomson | Added on 16 June 2010

Long-term access often requires co-operation from many staff. There is a risk that responsibilities are unclear. Consequently it is important that a senior member of staff is charged with delivering an organization’s digital preservation strategy.

Read more on the Blog.

Third case note released: leadership and long term access

Added on 16 June 2010

The DPC, with help from the National Library of Wales, Portico and ULCC, and with funding from JISC, is pleased to announce the launch of the third in a series of Digital Preservation Case Notes.  The Case Notes offer straightforward examples of organisations and individuals tackling the digital preservation challenges that come from mass digitization. 

Read More

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