DPC

'Preserving Transactional Data' Briefing Day, 17th March - Full Programme Announced

Added on 2 March 2016

Places are still available for the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) and UK Data Service Briefing Day on Preserving Transactional Data. This one-day event will take place in London on 17th March and features a keynote address by author of the report 'Preserving Transactional Data' Sara Day Thomson, plus speakers from the UK Data Archive, University College London and GESIS, the Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences who will discuss the issues facing long-term access to data that result from single, logical interactions with a database.

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Recording now available for PERICLES ‘Sheer Curation Tools’ webinar with Christine Sauter and Fabio Corubolo

Added on 26 February 2016

The recording from the first in the DPC and NCDD’s webinar series with Christine Sauter and Fabio Corubolo on the PERICLES Project's Sheer Curation Tools is now available online. Members can watch the recording in the members’ area of the DPC website using their login. 

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DPC York moves to Historic England offices

Added on 24 February 2016

We’ve moved! DPC York has moved in with our friends and colleagues at Historic England. From February 2016 you will be able to find us at 37 Tanner Row, York.

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DPC and NCDD Webinar: PERICLES 'Sheer Curation Tools'

Members please login to watch the webinar recording

PERICLES is a 4-year EU-funded RTD project (Feb 2013 – Jan 2017). This webinar will briefly outline the key concepts that are guiding the PERICLES research and development and introduce you to notions of “digital ecosystem”, “model-driven approach”, “scenario-based testbeds” and “sheer curation”. The overarching aim of PERICLES is to propose a novel approach on how to manage change in digital environments, taking it beyond the challenges of technological obsolescence, with the aim of ensuring long-term availability of digital information. The project outcome will be a testbed demonstration of the overall approach, which by its very nature does not aspire to constitute a system in itself, but describes means and deploys tools that support change management in digital environments. Most of the tools and their integration into a testbed are still work in progress. Two tools that the project developed first, the PET and the PeriCAT, were needed early on for substantiating and informing other more complex components of the project. However, they are also effective as stand-alone tools, applicable both for preservation and other purposes.

The PET tool is a framework for extracting useful information from the environment where digital objects are created and modified. The extracted information supports object use and reuse.The PeriCAT tool is a framework of Information Encapsulation techniques, which can be used to aggregate information, such as those extracted by PET. It supports the user in the selection of the best encapsulation approach based on the scenario under consideration. By the end of the session, participants will have: 

  • a clear impression of the PERICLES project research
  • a basic understanding of the use of the tools and their use cases
  • knowledge about the relevant documentation

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Preserving Transactional Data Briefing Day 17 March - registration now open to DPC members and UK Big Data Network centres

Added on 1 February 2016

DPC and the UK Data Service are pleased to announce that registration is now open to members for Preserving Transactional Data: a Briefing Day. The one-day event will take place in London on 17 March, hosted by DPC with a range of speakers to discuss the issues facing long-term access to data collected routinely by government and other organisations.

Registration is limited to members for two weeks, opening to the public on Friday 12 February.

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Webinar 17th Feb: PERICLES Sheer Curation Tools

Added on 27 January 2016

The DPC is delighted to invite members to join a webinar on Wednesday 17th February 1400-1500 with the PERICLES project.

PERICLES is a 4-year EU-funded RTD project (Feb 2013 – Jan 2017). This webinar will briefly outline the key concepts that are guiding the PERICLES research and development and introduce you to notions of “digital ecosystem”, “model-driven approach”, “scenario-based testbeds” and “sheer curation”. The overarching aim of PERICLES is to propose a novel approach on how to manage change in digital environments, taking it beyond the challenges of technological obsolescence, with the aim of ensuring long-term availability of digital information. The project outcome will be a testbed demonstration of the overall approach, which by its very nature does not aspire to constitute a system in itself, but describes means and deploys tools that support change management in digital environments. Most of the tools and their integration into a testbed are still work in progress. Two tools that the project developed first, the PET and the PeriCAT, were needed early on for substantiating and informing other more complex components of the project. However, they are also effective as stand-alone tools, applicable both for preservation and other purposes.

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The National Archives wants to hear from you...

Added on 25 January 2016

The UK National Archives are running an online survey to find out more about the needs of academics and researchers and the ways in which they might work more closely with the academic and scholarly communities, and to help inform the development of their services.If you are an academic, early career researcher, postgraduate student or independent researcher, they would like to hear from you. The survey takes around 10-15 minutes to complete and will cover, amongst other things:

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Digital Preservation Meets Big Data, Cambridge 14-15th March

Added on 22 January 2016

The University of Cambridge’s Big Data Strategic Research Initiative are pleased to announce a multidisciplinary conference on long term data preservation, to be held at Murray Edwards College, Cambridge on 14-15 March 2016.

As the worldwide volume of digital data undergoes exponential growth, Big Data technology allows unexpected value to be derived from existing and new datasets, and increasingly huge datasets to be recorded across all areas of academic research. As data volumes grow, and electronic storage deteriorates, the recoverability of this data is dependent upon curation of electronic archives and replacement of storage media, along with the ability to discover and access the data stored using technologies that may soon be obsolete. Decisions will need to be made about which data is kept, how it is stored, and how it can be accessed, in order that the scientific and human record from the current digital age is appropriately preserved for the future.

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What I Wish I Knew Before I Started: DPC Student Conference 2016

Presentation Slides

Blog Posts About the Event

Event Description

The DPC, with support from the Archives and Records Association, Arkivum, ULCC and the Institute for Historical Research, is pleased to invite students and researchers in archives, records management and librarianship to a one day conference on practical workplace skills in digital preservation. This conference will bring a select group of leading practitioners together with the next generation of archivists, records managers and librarians to discuss the challenges of digital collections management and digital preservation. The day will open with a consideration of digital preservation basics and a scan of emerging trends in digital preservation. In the afternoon, a group of invited speakers will be invited to reflect on 'the things they wish they knew before they started', or 'what I actually do all day' giving students an advantage in their own career development and helping those who frame the curriculum a chance to extend their students' readiness for the workplace.

This conference will:

  • Provide participants with a core grounding in applied digital preservation
  • Provide an overview of emerging trends in digital preservation
  • Present practical examples of the sorts skills that employers are looking from in staff working in digital preservation
  • Present role models of practitioners whose careers have taken them to leading positions in digital preservation
  • Allow students and their tutors to question practitioners about their day-to-day work and the skills that they reply upon

This day will be of interest to:

  • Students and recent graduates in library and archive schools
  • Students and recent graduates in information management and records management
  • Tutors, lecturers and course convenors in library and archive schools, or who teach records management or information governance
  • Innovators, vendors and commentators on digital preservation and cognate fields
  • Employers seeking to understand the skills needed to operate digital preservation facilities or seeking to recruit new entrants

Places are strictly limited and should be booked in advance. Priority will be given to DPC members and to students from relevant information management programmes.

Programme

09:30 Registration Opens

10:00 Session One – Getting Started with Digital Preservation
Welcome
Introduction to Digital Preservation – Sharon McMeekin, DPC
Digital Preservation, an Information Manager’s Perspective – Steph Taylor, ULCC
Digital Preservation, a Technologist’s Perspective – Matthew Addis, Arkivum
Sponsor Presentations

12:00 Lunch – Sandwich lunch and refreshments provided

12:45 Session Two – What I Wish I Knew Before I Started
Presentations from the following Invited Speakers on working within the Digital Preservation field.

  • Adrian Brown, Parliamentary Archives
  • Glenn Cumiskey, British Museum
  • Helen Hockx-Yu, Internet Archive
  • Ann MacDonald, University of Kent
  • Dave Thompson, Wellcome Collection

14:25 Comfort Break - Tea and coffee provided

14:45 Session Three – Roundtable with the Day’s Speakers

15:30 Thanks and Close

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Archive Sector Enterprise Training (ASSET) Project: Registration open for course modules

Added on 18 January 2016

Archive Sector Enterprise Training (ASSET) Project

KES is an independent worldwide association involving about 5000 professionals, engineers, academics, students and managers, operated on a not-for-profit basis, from a base in the UK. A number of universities around the world contribute to its organisation, operation and academic activities. The aim of the ASSET project is to provide archive sector professionals with skills necessary to contribute to achieving the BFI Film Forever strategic priority 'Unlocking the UK's Film Heritage'. Registration is now open for the following three modules:

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