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Newsroom

Created on Thursday, 17 April 2014 09:48

We're pleased to announce that the video of our recent 'Technology Bytes' Session with Courtney Mumma of Artefactual is now available for DPC members online at:

http://www.dpconline.org/members/conference-reports/1173-dpc-webinar-technology-bytes-archivematica-9-april-2014

… remember that you need a user name and password to access this.  If you need to register then you can do that online at:

http://www.dpconline.org/component/comprofiler/registers

   

Vacancy at King's College London: PhD Studentship

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PhD Studentship in Digital Humanities / Information Management
Salary Range: Stipend and fees
Post type: Full Time
Location: London
Closing Date: 31st May 2014

Technical Narratives: method, purpose, use and value in the technical description and analysis of software-based artApplications are invited for an AHRC-funded Collaborative Partnership Award at King’s College London and Tate, to investigate two main questions: How are software-based artworks to be described and represented for the purposes of preservation, understanding and access? What constitutes technical art history for software-based artworks?

The term ‘software-based artwork’ refers to art where software is the primary artistic medium. These works form complex systems exhibiting a range of dependencies on changing hardware, commercial software, interfaces or technological environments. Software-based artworks may include bespoke elements coded by the artist or their programmer, and many are interactive or involve complex systems that exhibit particular behaviour, such as responding to a visitor or searching for keywords on the internet.

We invite applications from candidates from a range of different backgrounds, which may include conservation, digital preservation, digital humanities, information science, computer science or curatorial practice. Successful applicants will normally have a good first degree (at least 2.1, or international equivalent) in a relevant field, and will have obtained or be currently working towards a Masters degree at Merit level (or international equivalent) in a relevant field. If English is not a candidate’s native language, he or she will also need to satisfy the English language entry requirements of King’s College London.

For more information see: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/graduate/funding/database/index.php?action=view&id=563

   

Created on Tuesday, 15 April 2014 09:57

The EC-finded  E-Ark Project (www.eark-project.eu) is conducting a survey on best practice in digital preservation online at:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/E_ARK_survey_2014_03

The Project will collect information about current solutions for digital archiving in Europe. You can help us to understand the methods, tools and standards which are relevant to you. Your feedback will be analysed and the outcome will be included in our published best practice recommendations for digital preservation.  We will write to inform you when these are published and where you can download them. All answers are anonymised so no information which you provide will be publicly attributed to your institution.All memory institutions, digital preservation or electronic records management solution providers and other related parties are welcome to participate. Questions are categorized by responder’s type. This means that you shouldn’t be bothered with questions that aren’t relevant for you.

As the survey has focused questions it should take about 15 minutes to complete. We would be grateful if you could complete the survey before April 30. Your participation will make an important contribution to improvement in digital preservation practices. Please feel free to invite colleagues to take part in this survey.

For more information about E-Ark see: www.eark-project.eu

   

Preserving eBooks, London 12th May: registration open

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Registration is now open for ‘Preserving eBooks’ in London on 12th May.

http://www.dpconline.org/events/details/77-preserving-ebooks?xref=90%3Apreserving-ebooks

The production, distribution and consumption of books have been transformed in the last decade: the technologies that support the book trade have been revolutionised; new entrants into the market suddenly enjoy a dominant position; readers’ expectations of how and what they consume have altered; and the boundaries between books and other types of media are no longer clear. New formats, new expectations about ownership and rapid changes in the underlying economics of the industry each create significant preservation risks. The ‘facts on the ground’ already challenge the ways that memory institutions have historically cared for published content, while rapid innovation means that those who preserve eBooks need to respond adroitly to unseen processes largely outside their control. Although there is much to learn from eJournal preservation, the reality of eBook production is that of a much larger and much more diverse market where processes are less well understood and in which the potential for loss is considerably greater.

The DPC has commissioned a Technology Watch Report to review the distinctive problems of eBook preservation. This day-long briefing will give DPC members a preview of the report and provide a forum for those interested in the topic to discuss the issues with colleagues and representatives of the publishing industry. As well as introducing the latest thinking on eBook preservation, it will look to emerging trends in the publishing industry, helping participants adapt their responses for the long term.

This workshop will interest:

  • Collections managers, librarians, curators and archivists in memory institutions
  • Production managers, archivists and executives in the publishing industry
  • CIOs and CTOs in organisations managing commercial intellectual property
  • Vendors and developers with digital preservation solutions
  • Researchers with interests in publishing, e-infrastructure and digital preservation
  • Managers and staff delivering book digitisation projects
  • Researchers and practitioners interested in digital rights management
  • Publishing industry 'insiders'

DPC members can attend for free.

   

Preserving eBooks, London May 12th - member registration now open

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Priority registration is now open for DPC members to attend ‘Preserving eBooks’ in London on 12th May.

http://www.dpconline.org/events/details/77-preserving-ebooks?xref=90%3Apreserving-ebooks

The production, distribution and consumption of books have been transformed in the last decade: the technologies that support the book trade have been revolutionised; new entrants into the market suddenly enjoy a dominant position; readers’ expectations of how and what they consume have altered; and the boundaries between books and other types of media are no longer clear. New formats, new expectations about ownership and rapid changes in the underlying economics of the industry each create significant preservation risks. The ‘facts on the ground’ already challenge the ways that memory institutions have historically cared for published content, while rapid innovation means that those who preserve eBooks need to respond adroitly to unseen processes largely outside their control. Although there is much to learn from eJournal preservation, the reality of eBook production is that of a much larger and much more diverse market where processes are less well understood and in which the potential for loss is considerably greater.

The DPC has commissioned a Technology Watch Report to review the distinctive problems of eBook preservation. This day-long briefing will give DPC members a preview of the report and provide a forum for those interested in the topic to discuss the issues with colleagues and representatives of the publishing industry. As well as introducing the latest thinking on eBook preservation, it will look to emerging trends in the publishing industry, helping participants adapt their responses for the long term.

This workshop will interest:

  • Collections managers, librarians, curators and archivists in memory institutions
  • Production managers, archivists and executives in the publishing industry
  • CIOs and CTOs in organisations managing commercial intellectual property
  • Vendors and developers with digital preservation solutions
  • Researchers with interests in publishing, e-infrastructure and digital preservation
  • Managers and staff delivering book digitisation projects
  • Researchers and practitioners interested in digital rights management
  • Publishing industry 'insiders'

DPC members can attend for free and have priority registration till the 14th April.

   

Registration now open for the next members-only 'Technology Bytes' session with Porter Olsen from BitCurator

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Registration is now open for the next in the series of the DPC’s ‘Technology Bytes: Tools and Services for Digital Preservation in Bite-Sized Chunks’ Webinar Series. The third session, which will be brought to us by Porter Olsen from BitCurator, will take place on Wednesday 23rd April at 1pm.

 Following the success of our hugely popular event 'Procuring Preservation: Writing and Understanding Requirements in Digital Preservation' in December 2013, the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) is pleased to invite members only to this webinar series where vendors and tool developers will present the tools they currently support and their plans for the future.

Registration for this session is now open and free for DPC members. Places are strictly limited and should be booked in advance. For more details and to register, see the the event page: http://www.dpconline.org/events/details/76-procuring-preservation-vendor-webinar-series?xref=85%3ABitCurator

   

Recording from DPC 'Technology Bytes' with Matthew Addis from Arkivum now available

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The recording from the first in our series of DPC 'Technology Bytes: Tools and Services for Digital Preservation in Bite-Sized Chunks' with Matthew Addis from Arkivum is now available. Members can watch the recording and download the slides and notes from Matthew's presentation in the members area of the DPC website using their login. 

   

Vacancy at Glasgow University: Lecturer in Digital Humanities / Information Management

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Lecturer in Digital Humanities / Information Management
Salary Range: £32,590 - £36,661pa
Post type: Permanent / Full Time
Location: Gilmorehill, Glasgow
Closing Date: 25th April 2014

Glasgow University seeks to employ a lecturer in digital humanities / information management to make a significant contribution to the expansion of high quality research in one or more of the following areas: digital curation, digital heritage, knowledge and information management, information retrieval and access, archival and  library science, records management, user studies, information society and  knowledge economy, and digital humanities related topics regarding the interplay of people, information, technology and social structures; and to participate effectively across HATII’s teaching programmes.

Main duties and responsibilities are as follows:

  • To develop and sustain individual / joint research projects of international standard and demonstrable in the School, Centre or relevant Unit of Assessment and to pursue and secure external funding for the same through successful grant applications to Research Councils and other funding bodies.
  • To contribute fully to developing and enhancing the research profile of the Unit of Assessment, School and College, including maintaining a track record of high quality publications and demonstrable impact.
  • To participate fully in the School, College and University’s research culture and to attend and participate in appropriate research seminars/conferences.
  • To be responsible for the supervision and training of postgraduate, Masters and doctoral students and to ensure their effective development in line with University and (where relevant) funder guidelines
  • To participate in the design, review, organisation, delivery and assessment of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching activities in accordance with the School’s programmes, including the delivery and development of cross teaching and employability initiatives.
  • To participate fully in the assessment process (using a variety of methods and techniques) and provide effective, timely and appropriate feedback to students to support their learning.To undertake School/College level administration as directed and supported by the Head of School or VP Head of College.
  • To work effectively in co-operation with colleagues in the School, College and University as a whole.
  • To provide student support at College level, normally through acting as an adviser.
  • To develop research and where appropriate teaching initiatives, which support the School and College Knowledge Exchange agendas.
  • To engage in professional development as appropriate.
  • To contribute to the enhancement of the University’s international profile in line with the University’s Strategic Plan, Glasgow 2020 – A Global Vision (http://www.gla.ac.uk/media/media_180610_en.pdf)

For more details see: http://www22.i-grasp.com/fe/tpl_glasgow01.asp?newms=jj&id=74964&newlang=1

   

Week-long courses available with ICPSR Summer Programme and the University of Essex

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The Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) Summer Program, a unit of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, is offering a week-long course this year focused on curating and managing research data:

Curating and Managing Research Data for Re-use, July 28th - August 1st, 2014 - http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/sumprog/courses/0149

This workshop, taught by Louise Corti (UK Data Archive), Jared Lyle (ICPSR), and Veerle Van den Eynden (UK Data Archive), will explore and apply the concepts and benefits of life cycle principles for data curation, from selecting and preparing data for archiving to optimizing and promoting data for reuse. ICPSR social science quantitative datasets and UK Data Archive qualitative and cross-disciplinary data collections will serve as case studies and participants will track the datasets as they make their way through the data assessment, review, processing, curation and publication pipeline.  Participants will learn about and gain proficiency in the full range of life cycle activities: data review and preparation; confidential data management; effective documentation practices; how to create, comply with, and evaluate required data management plans; digital repository requirements and assessment; data dissemination and publication; and running user support and promotional activities for data. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on exercises demonstrating curation practices and on small group discussions for sharing local experiences and learning from others.

The workshop is aimed at individuals interested or actively engaged in the curation and management of research data, in view of data sharing and reuse, particularly data librarians, data archivists, data producers and stewards with responsibilities for data management.

   

'Technology Bytes: Tools and Services for Digital Preservation in Bite-Sized Chunks' - Session two now open for member registration

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Following the success of the hugely popular event 'Procuring Preservation: Writing and Understanding Requirements in Digital Preservation ' in December 2013, the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) is pleased to invite members to a series of 'Technology Bytes' webinars over the coming months, offering a deeper dive into the various tools and technologies available within the marketplace.

Hailed as ‘one of the most useful events ever held,’ attendees found particular value in ‘getting competing suppliers and potential customers to engage in an open discussion’ at the Procuring Preservation event, and were pleased to have the right ‘mix of people together to talk to each other.’

Following up the suggestion from the Procuring Preservation ‘un-conference,’ the webinar series is a ‘next step’ and an opportunity understand the strengths of products available, how these might be best applied to digital preservation in practice, as well as providing a platform for members to voice their needs and concerns directly to representatives of a wide range of solution providers.

The webinars will interest:

  • Collections managers, librarians, curators and archivists in all institutions
  • IT managers and procurement managers in memory institutions
  • Records managers in institutions with a need for long-lived data
  • CIOs and CTOs in organisations with commercial intellectual property
  • Vendors and developers with digital preservation solutions
  • Researchers with interests in research data management

The webinars start next week and take place every two weeks until June:

  • Wednesday 26th March, 1pm - Matthew Addis, Arkivum: Registration now closed
  • Wednesday 9th April, 4pm - Courtney Mumma, Artefactual
  • Wednesday 23rd April, 1pm - Porter Olsen, BitCurator
  • Wednesday 7th May, 1pm - Mike Quinn, Tessella
  • Wednesday 21st May, 1pm - Nir Sherwinter, Ex Libris
  • Wednesday 4th June, 1pm - Luis Faria, KEEP Solutions
  • Wednesday 18th June, 1pm - Michelle Kimpton, Duraspace

Registration is now open for the second session with Artefactual on Wednesday 9th Aprilhttp://www.dpconline.org/events/details/76-procuring-preservation-vendor-webinar-series?xref=84%3AArtefactual

The webinars are available to members only and free of charge, but places are limited so early registration is recommended. Registration for subsequent dates will be announced in due course and all webinars will be recorded and published to the members’ area of the DPC website.

   

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