DPC

New Digital Preservation Frequently Asked Question section on the DPC website

Added on 20 April 2010

The DPC has opened a new 'Frequently Asked Questions' section of its website where members can post and answer questions on the topic of digital preservation.  Discussion around these Frequently Asked Questions have previously tended to happen on the DPC's closed discussion lists.  Putting on the website allows a wider group of people to see them and to refer back to them more easily. The new facility allows users to comment directly on the questions without having to use email.

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Freeze Frame: Preservation Partnerships

Sara Day Thomson

Sara Day Thomson

Last updated on 13 December 2016

Partnership is a critical success factor for long term access to data from small or short-lived projects. This depends on a thoughtful dialogue between the project team and their preservation partner. Thorough documentation will be required.

In this case note we examine the relationship between the relatively short lived Freeze Frame project at the Scott Polar Research Institute and the institutional repository which offered to provide long term preservation services to ensure ongoing access at the end of the project. This study shows that small organisations don't necessarily need to establish a sophisticated preservation infrastructure when they embark on digitisation and that partnerships need need to be managed but can bring unexpected benefits to both parties.

See the full text of the case note here.

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Freeze Frame: Preservation Partnerships

By Sara Day Thomson | Added on 23 April 2010

Partnership is a critical success factor for long term access to data from small or short-lived projects. This depends on a thoughtful dialogue between the project team and their preservation partner. 

Read more on the blog.

e-Journals are forever?

The benefits of online access to scholarly journal content are now taken for granted but there are threats to continuity of such access.  Clarity is needed on who is doing what, what has been agreed, and what mechanisms exist for continued access, with shared responsibility for the material support and sustainability of archiving and access schemes.

The threats of digital preservation are becoming well known and the community of researchers and librarians look to policy makers and funders for assurance that archiving schemes can be made viable: that content will continue to exist. There is now growing and urgent concern about assurance of access to back content should budget restrictions result in subscription cancellations: that there is 'post-cancellation access'. Following several reports and studies a variety of archiving agencies and schemes have emerged to assist libraries and publishers manage these risks – but the options can seem confusing.

This one-day workshop, jointly sponsored by the DPC, EDINA and JISC brings together those responsible for e-journal strategy and archiving action in the UK. The aim is to share information on collaborative activities and identify basis for action at institutional, national and international levels.

The event is free of charge, but places are limited so early reservation is recommended. Priority registration will be offered to DPC Members and members of the UK LOCKSS Alliance.

Why should you attend?

  • Learn about new and emerging tools for managing E-journal content.
  • Help to shape policy on E-journal preservation and access.
  • Share your own concerns and aspirations for preservation and access.
  • Find out what other institutions are doing.
  • Anticipate the evolution of a rapidly changing field.
  • Contribute your expertise to the ongoing discussion.

Who are the sponsors?

  • The Digital Preservation Coalition is a not-for profit membership organisation whose primary objective is to raise awareness of the importance of the preservation of digital material and the attendant strategic, cultural and technological issues. Its vision is to make our digital memory accessible tomorrow.
  • EDINA is the national data centre based at the University of Edinburgh.EDINA delivers support for the UK LOCKSS Alliance, a cooperative activity by UK libraries committed to identify, negotiate, and build local archives of material that librarians and academic scholars deem significant.  It also acts as an open access platform for 'orphaned content'  for CLOCKSS (of which the University of Edinburgh is the Archive Node in Europe) and works in partnership with ISSN-IC and JISC Collections in the PEPRS and PeCAN projects.
  • JISC promotes and supports the innovative use of digital technologies for the benefit of UK colleges and universities and helps to maintain the UK’s position as a global leader in education. JISC provides: a world-class network; funding for ground-breaking technical development;access to electronic resources; new environments for learning, teaching and research; guidance on institutional change; advisory and consultancy services; and regional support services.

Programme (this programme may be subject to changes)

09:30-10:00
Registration, tea & coffee
Session One: Setting the Agenda (Chaired by Neil Grindley, JISC)
10:00-10:10
Welcome and introduction
Dr William Kilbride, DPC
10:10-10:30
Tony Kidd, Glasgow University Library
10:30-10:50
Peter Burnhill, EDINA
10:50-11:10
Nancy McGovern, ICPSR
11:10-11:20
Q&A
11:20-11:40
Coffee & Tea
Session Two: Policy and Action (Chaired by Peter Burnhill, EDINA)
11:40-12:00
Responsibility and Policy in Action at the UK National Level [no slides were used for this presentation]
Derek Law
12:00-12:20
Lorraine Estelle, JISC collections
12:20- 12:40
David Tempest, ELSEVIER
12:40-13:00
Michael Jubb, RIN
13:00-13:15
Q&A
13:15-14:00
Lunch
Session Three: Improving the UK Response (Chaired by William Kilbride, DPC)
14:00-14:20
Gordon Tibbitts, CLOCKSS
14:20-14:40
Eileen Fenton, Portico
14:40-15:00
Lee-Ann Coleman, British Library
15:00-15:20
Adam Rusbridge, UK LOCKSS Alliance
Panel Session:
15:20-16:10
Considering Academic Library Policy
Paul Gemmill, RCUK, RLUK/SCONUL, JISC, Elsevier.
16:10-16:15
Close
William Kilbride, DPC
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First Digital Preservation Case Notes Released

Added on 30 April 2010

The DPC, with help from the Scott Polar Research Institute, Portico and ULCC, and with funding from JISC, is pleased to announce the launch of the first in a series of Digital Preservation Case Notes.  The Case Notes offer straightforward examples of organisations and individuals tackling the digital preservation challenges that come from mass digitization.  The first describes the Scott Polar Research Institute's 'Freeze Frame' project.  It makes the point that short lived projects need to do some long term thinking to ensure that the benefits of digitization are robust and it describes how a short term project negotiated its way round this long term problem.

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Scottish Arts Council joins the Digital Preservation Coalition

Added on 30 April 2010

The Scottish Arts Council has taken a significant step to securing a lasting legacy from Scotland's digital creativity by joining the Digital Preservation Coalition. In doing so it joins a growing number of strategic bodies and memory institutions taking steps to ensure that digital objects can be accessible to future generation.

'The Scottish Arts Council takes digital preservation seriously', explained Kate Wallace, Senior Research Officer, Scottish Arts Council. 'Preserving a digital legacy for future generations of artists, organisations and the public gives greater access and can inspire learning.'

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DPC Launches Prospectus for 2010-2011

Added on 11 May 2010

The DPC has today released a prospectus for activities from August 2010 to July 2011. It describes the benefits of membership and introduces a new class of membership for personal members.

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Second Digital Preservation Case Note Released

Added on 17 May 2010

The Digital Preservation Coalition, with ULCC and Portico, with the support of the National Archives and sponsorship from JISC is pleased to announce the release of the second in our series of Digital Preservation Case Notes.

In this case note we examine the relationship between policy and practice in digital preservation.  The National Archives has digitised a significant volume of the UK's Cabinet Papers, using techniques and practices that they have developed over many years.  It has considerable expertise in digital preservation. However the measure of their commitment to long term preservation is not so much their undoubted expertise so much as their carefully considered policy framework for the long term management of digital resources. Funders often ask to see policy documents in assessing grant applications: for digitisation grants, or other grants likely to create prolific amounts of new and valuable digital content, it is reasonable to assess their digital preservation policies.

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Cabinet Papers: Policy as a Measure of Commitment

Sara Day Thomson

Sara Day Thomson

Last updated on 13 December 2016

Digital preservation policies indicate whether an organization is committed to long-term access. Grant giving organizations should request copies of applicant’s digital preservation policies when funding data creation.

In this case note we examine the relationship between policy and practice in digital preservation. The National Archives has digitised a significant volume of the UK's Cabinet Papers, using techniques and practices that they have developed over many years. It has considerable expertise in digital preservation. However the measure of their commitment to long term preservation is not so much their undoubted expertise so much as their carefully considered policy framework for the long term management of digital resources. Funders often ask to see policy documents in assessing grant applications: for digitisation grants, or other grants likely to create prolific amounts of new and valuable digital content, it is reasonable to assess their digital preservation policies.

See the full text of the case note here.

Read More

Cabinet Papers: Policy as a Measure of Commitment

By Sara Day Thomson | Added on 17 May 2010

Digital preservation policies indicate whether an organization is committed to long-term access. Grant giving organizations should request copies of applicant’s digital preservation policies when funding data creation.

Read more on the Blog.

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